Biology

In Biology students investigate and learn about the structure and function of a range of living organisms, how they interact with other living things and with their environment. Students engage in practical investigations and explore contemporary issues in Biology.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Sciences

 

Chemistry

The study of Chemistry involves investigating and learning about the properties, uses, means of production, and reactions of natural and processed materials. It also includes a critical study of the social and environmental impact of materials and chemical processes.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Sciences

 

English

In English students analyse the interrelationship of author, text, and audience, with an emphasis on how language and stylistic features shape ideas and perspectives in a range of contexts. They consider social, cultural, economic, historical, and/or political perspectives in texts and their representation of human experience and the world.
Students explore how the purpose of a text is achieved through application of text conventions and stylistic choices to position the audience to respond to ideas and perspectives. An understanding of purpose, audience, and context is applied in students’ own creation of imaginative, interpretive, analytical, and persuasive texts that may be written, oral, and/or multimodal.
Students have opportunities to reflect on their personal values and those of other people by responding to aesthetic and cultural aspects of texts from the contemporary world, from the past, and from Australian and other cultures.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: English

 

English Literary Studies

Stage 2 English Literary Studies focuses on the skills and strategies of critical thinking needed to interpret texts. Through shared and individual study of texts, students encounter different opinions about texts, have opportunities to exchange and develop ideas, find evidence to support a personal view, learn to construct logical and convincing arguments, and consider a range of critical interpretations of texts.
English Literary Studies focuses on ways in which literary texts represent culture and identity, and on the dynamic relationship between authors, texts, audiences, and contexts. Students develop an understanding of the power of language to represent ideas, events, and people in particular ways and of how texts challenge or support cultural perceptions.
Students produce responses that show the depth and clarity of their understanding. They extend their ability to sustain a reasoned critical argument by developing strategies that allow them to weigh alternative opinions against each other. By focusing on the creativity and craft of the authors, students develop strategies to enhance their own skills in creating texts and put into practice the techniques they have observed.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: English

 

English as an Additional Language

Stage 2 English as an Additional Language is designed for students who speak English as a second or additional language or dialect, and whose English language proficiency is restricted (i.e. below Language and Literacy Level 12).
All students who want to enrol in an English as an Additional Language subject will be required to apply to the SACE Board for eligibility. Students whose eligibility applications are approved for Stage 1 English as an Additional Language do not have to reapply for eligibility to enrol in Stage 2 English as an Additional Language.
This subject focuses on the development and use of skills and strategies in communication, comprehension, language and text analysis, and text creation.
Through studying a variety of oral, written, and multimodal texts, including informational and literary texts, students develop an understanding of text structures and language features. Students explore the relationship between the structures and features and the purpose, audience, and context of texts. Information, ideas, and opinions in texts are identified and evaluated. Personal, social, and cultural perspectives in texts are analysed and evaluated.
Students develop confidence in creating texts for different purposes in both real and imagined contexts. Students broaden their understanding of sociocultural and sociolinguistic aspects of English, through their study of texts and language. They develop skills and strategies for research and academic study in the areas of communication, comprehension, language and text analysis and text creation.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: English

 

Geography

The discipline of geography deals with environmental phenomena and human activities as diverse as natural hazards, landforms, tourism, economic development, agriculture, and urban planning. Through the study of Geography, students develop an understanding of the spatial interrelationships of people, places, and environments. They develop an understanding of how people interact with environments differently in different places and at different times, and of the opportunities, challenges, and constraints of different locations.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Humanities and Social Sciences

 

Geology

Students design and conduct geological investigations and gather evidence from fieldwork, experiments, and research. They have the opportunity to engage with the work of practising geologists and join and/or initiate debates about how geology impacts on our own lives, society, and the environment.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Sciences

 

Health Science

This subject provides the opportunity for students interested in Health Sciences to examine the determinants of Health and emerging patterns and trends in Health. Students will also be able to personalise their learning to focus on areas of interest. The subject is interdisciplinary and will use a range of problem based learning approaches to examine real world examples. All assessment will be project based.

Credits: 40
Learning Area: Sciences (2 Year 12 subjects)

 

Mathematical Methods

This subject helps students to develop an increasingly complex and sophisticated understanding of calculus and statistics. By using functions and their derivatives and integrals, and by mathematically modelling physical processes, students develop a deep understanding of the physical world through a sound knowledge of relationships involving rates of change. Students use statistics to describe and analyse phenomena that involve uncertainty and variation.
Mathematical Methods provides the foundation for further study in mathematics, economics, computer sciences, and the sciences. It prepares students for courses and careers that may involve the use of statistics, such as health or social sciences.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Mathematics

 

Media Studies

Media Studies develops students’ media literacy and practical production skills. Actively engaging and interacting with media, while learning to make informed choices, students will discuss and analyse media issues and create their own multimodal products. Working both individually and collaboratively, Media Studies is a great opportunity for students to have a meaningful creative outlet during the rigours of Year 12.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Humanities and Social Sciences

 

Modern History

The study of history gives students the opportunity to make sense of a complex and rapidly changing world by connecting past and present. Through the study of past events, actions, and phenomena students gain an insight into human nature and the ways in which individuals and societies function. Students research and review sources within a framework of inquiry and critical analysis.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Humanities and Social Sciences

 

Physics

The study of physics offers opportunities for students to understand and appreciate the physical world. This subject requires the investigation and interpretation of phenomena of physics through a study of motion in two dimensions, electricity and magnetism, light and matter, and atoms and nuclei.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Sciences

 

Psychology

The study of psychology enables students to understand their own behaviours and the behaviours of others. It has direct relevance to their personal lives. Psychological knowledge can be applied to improve outcomes and the quality of experience in various areas of life, such as education, intimate relationships, child rearing, employment and leisure.

Credits: 10 or 20
Learning Area: Sciences

 

Research Project

The Research Project gives students the opportunity to study an area of interest in depth. It allows students to use their creativity and initiative, while developing the research and presentation skills they will need in further study or work.
Students will choose a topic of interest—it may be linked to a SACE subject or course, or to a workplace or community context. They will learn and apply research processes and the knowledge and skills specific to their research topic and record their research and evaluate what they have learnt.
The term ‘research’ is used broadly and may include practical or technical investigations, formal research, or exploratory enquiries.

Credits: 10
Learning Area: Cross-disciplinary

 

Scientific Studies – Human Performance

Through Scientific Studies students develop knowledge of scientific principles and concepts through their own investigations. They develop the skills and abilities to explain scientific phenomena, and to draw evidence-based conclusions from investigations of science-related issues. This program in Human Performance combines a theoretical and practical study of human movement, health and physical performance. Students gain an understanding of human functioning and physical activity with a focus on bio-mechanics and sport psychology. Students explore their own physical capacities and analyse performance and health issues.

Credits: 10 or 20
Learning Area: Sciences

 

Scientific Studies – Aviation

Through Scientific Studies students develop knowledge of scientific principles and concepts through their own investigations. They develop the skills and abilities to explain scientific phenomena, and to draw evidence-based conclusions from investigations of science-related issues. This program in Aviation concerns itself principally with Flight Operations. It covers most of the theory and appropriate applications leading to a private pilot’s license. Topics include aviation units and charts, aerodynamics, aircraft general knowledge, flight operation and performance, flight planning, meteorology, navigation, human factors and other issues. Extended work will be undertaken with radio and navigation systems. Theory will be complemented with appropriate practical resources including an industry standard multi-functional synthetic flight trainer. Through these activities students learn about physics, the environment and society in a practical setting.

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Science

 

Specialist Mathematics

This subject draws on and deepens students’ mathematical knowledge, skills, and understanding, and provides opportunities for students to develop their skills in using rigorous mathematical arguments and proofs, and using mathematical models. It includes the study of functions and calculus. This subject can lead to further study in a range of tertiary courses such as mathematical sciences, engineering, computer science, and physical sciences. Students envisaging careers in related fields will benefit from studying this subject.

Specialist Mathematics is designed to be studied in conjunction with Mathematical Methods

Credits: 20
Learning Area: Mathematics

 

University Extension Study

University Extension Study gives students the opportunity to undertake a first year university subject as a part of their SACE Stage 2 program. The university subject counts as a “Recognised Study” for SACE completion and for the calculation of an ATAR. Students normally complete two separate semester courses at university. The results for these two courses combined count for a 20 credit subject for the SACE. Achievement in the university subjects counts for university course completion when the students enrol in a full undergraduate program at university. Entry into University Extension Study is by invitation of the principal using school-based selection criteria.

Credits: 10 or 20
Learning Area: Recognised Study

 

For further information about SACE subjects and SACE completion requirements see www.sace.sa.edu.au

For information about the calculation of an Australian Tertiary Admission Rank (ATAR) see www.satac.edu.au

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