In a project of passion, students & staff have been designing and fabricating their own custom ukuleles, using programs such as Fusion 360 to design and then 3D print the plastics parts, and Adobe Illustrator to design the wooden components which were cut using the laser cutter. 

“Spending so much time in the Ideation Studio truly taught all of us the art of ‘trial and error’ and expanded our ways of thinking to be more critical and creative. This enhancement in involved us trouble shooting problems with our design and enabled the process of prototyping each separate component of the ukuleles until we had a practical and structurally sound design. Students really took the project on as their own and were agents to make their customs designs”

What was your favourite thing about the ‘Ukes of Hazard’ Adventure Space?

Adele: “Being able to create something that will last forever and learning new skills whilst doing it!”

AJ: “Similar to woodwork, and it was my favourite subject at my old school. I learnt how to use the laser cutter that I’ve never used before and I got to brush up on my 3D printing skills. I liked making my own ukulele so that I didn’t have to buy one.

Aidan: “Loved having a chance to do woodwork at this school. I choose to paint my ukulele because it’s a way to display my creativity and make something that I will use and share my creation with my family.”

Thomas: “I enjoyed using modern technology and hands on traditional tools and techniques to make custom musical instruments. I enjoyed the whole process and feeling of accomplishment in all who took part.”

Nikki: “My favourite thing about this adventure space was combining both of the talents of Thomas and I to create a ukulele and then give students guidance to create their own. Spending so much time in the ideation studio truly taught all of us the art of ‘trial and error’ and thinking critically and creatively to try to solve issues with our design and prototype parts of the ukuleles until we had a practical and structurally sound design. Students really took the project on as their own and were agents in their customs designs as they sought guidance and demonstrations from Thomas and I ‘to create their vision, this highlight reflects the way of learning at the ASMS.”